ESET’s top 5 tips for safe online shopping this festive season 0 1074

safe online shopping

Holiday shopping is so quick and easy to do online, no traffic to get to the store, no waiting in queues or travelling to one specific shop just to find out – oh no, they’re out of stock of the one item you went there for.

We want to make sure your holiday shopping experience is quick, easy and most of all safe. Here are our top 5 tips for safe shopping this festive season:

  1. Don’t have the same passwords for all online shopping sites, have strong passwords and for extra security, change them before the holiday shopping commences.
  2. Only shop on trusted sites and directly from vendors.
  3. Don’t click on links from emails, instead go straight to the site on your browser.
  4.  When shopping online use a secure internet connection such as your home WiFi and make sure the necessary firewalls are in place – Avoid online payments via public WiFi.
  5. This coupled with a strong antivirus and/or anti-spyware software for scanning email, applications, and data that resides on your computer, you can rest assured that only you will catch or detect any form of intrusion in good time.

To find out how ESET can help secure your online shopping experience visit our website or contact us at sales@esetafrica.com

 

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Flaws in email encryption revealed 0 478

email encryption

A team of 8 academics have discovered weaknesses in OpenPGP and S/MIME encryption protocols which could lead to the plain text of encrypted emails being exposed to attackers. The academics have named these flaws “EFAIL”.

Insights from cryptography expert Bruce Schneier explained that “[t]he vulnerability isn’t with PGP or S/MIME itself, but in the way they interact with modern e-mail programs.”

To be able exploit the weaknesses, you would first need to access the end-to-end-encrypted email message. This could be by way of stealing it from a compromised account or by intercepting its path. Following this, the attacker would need to alter the email, adding a custom HTML code and then sending this new version onto the victim. The victim’s email client decrypts the email and is tricked by the malicious code into sending the full plaintext of the emails to the attackers. Even messages sent years ago are vulnerable.

The team said that their proof-of-concept exploit has been shown to be successful against 25 out of 35 tested S/MIME email clients and 10 out of 28 OpenPGP clients. The flaws affect email applications such as Apple Mail with the GPGTools encryption plug-in, Mozilla Thunderbird with the Enigmail plug-in, and Outlook with the Gpg4win encryption package. The academics said that, in keeping with the principles of responsible disclosure, they have reported their findings to all email providers concerned.

Time to change your Twitter password 0 623

Twitter Password

An internal bug exposed the passwords of an undisclosed number of the more than 330 million Twitter users.

Twitter CTO Parag Agrawal announced that it was a “bug that stored passwords unmasked in an internal log”. He went on to state “we have fixed the bug and our investigation shows no indication of breach or misuse”.

The Social Media platform are insisting that there is no sign of danger and that there is no reason to believe that the passwords were exposed outside of the organisation. However, they are still advising users to change their Twitter passwords and those of any other online service using the same password.

Some additional password tips from Twitter include enabling two-factor authentication and also using a password manager to create a strong and unique password for every individual online service.