Free online cybersecurity training for businesses in Kenya 0 211

Free online cybersecurity training

Internet security company ESET East Africa has announced the availability of free cybersecurity training for businesses and their employees in Kenya.

The ESET Cybersecurity Awareness Training course that will be offered over the internet aims at enabling firms to curb the impact of cyber attacks and data breaches that are becoming more severe to business operations around the world.

A recent survey by ESET in its North American markets found that more than 30 percent of people polled have never received any cyber training or education in their workplace, even though majority of cyber breaches are caused by employee errors and ommissions.

“We know that this ratio is much higher in East Africa and possibly worse across the continent. Businesses, especially SMEs that lack resources to provide even basic training now have an easier way to ensure their employees get the cybersecurity awareness they need, while meeting compliance requirements“, said Teddy Njoroge, ESET Country Manager in charge of Kenya.

IT professionals, small business owners and others can sign up to access the modules anytimeModules in the ESET Cybersecurity Awareness Training include, web and email protection,  how to spot phishing emails, password best practices, social engineering, two-factor authentication and Internet of Things (IoT) security.

All topics in the training are core and need to know for all employees. They are explained in user-friendly language, and can be completed in under 90 minutes. On completion employees will be expected to report to their manager and receive a certificate of completion.

The announcement by ESET, which is celebrating 30 years of innovation in the Internet Security services industry, comes just a month after the globally devastating WannaCryptor Ransomware attack which crippled hundreds of organizations while shutting down over 200,000 computers around the globe.

“A simple but successful cyberattack or data breach, can be devastating with impacts such as litigation, increased insurance premiums, among other reputational issues. All these can directly affect the company’s bottom line, and for this reason, training employees on cyber security best practices is a must“,  Njoroge added.

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Coming to terms with cyber security nightmare 0 195

Teddy Njoroge

Last year internet security companies made forecasts about possible cyber-threats to really worry about this year. This we followed with measures that companies and individuals needed to take to ensure a cyber-safe 2018. Paramount among these was the need for proactive use of protective software tools as well as sensitisation and training of users about these threats.

True to predictions, 2018 started with a scenario hardly anyone could have foreseen. Two serious design vulnerabilities in Computer Central Processing Units (CPUs) were exposed that could enable cyber-criminals to steal sensitive or private information such as passwords, documents and photos among other data from unsecured devices.

The “Meltdown and Spectre” CPU vulnerabilities point to a much larger underlying issue. Software bugs and hardware bugs are more common than not, but these once identified can be fixed fairly easily with either a software patch or firmware update for hardware issues.

However, as it turns out this is not possible with these two vulnerabilities as they are caused by a design flaw in the hardware architecture, only fixable by replacing the actual hardware. And that is where the problems begin.

CPUs of affected manufacturers such as AMD, ARM, Intel, among others appear in a lot of Internet of Things (IoT) devices and which are scattered all over the globe.

According to ARM, they are already “securing” a trillion (1,000,000,000,000) devices. Granted, not all ARM CPUs are affected, but if even 0.1 per cent of them are, it still means a billion (1,000,000,000) affected devices.

Due to the huge costs involved, it is not feasible to replace all these faulty CPUs. In reality people will keep their existing devices until end of their life cycles, for years even.

Deployed for countless and diverse applications in the households or offices, once operational many owners have most likely forgotten that they have them and which inherently leaves a giant gap for cybercriminals to exploit.

Any Wi-Fi-controlled device such as refrigerator, digital picture frames, Smart TVs, DVRs and PVRs etc., potentially provides opportunity for sensitive data to be lost. For example, a compromised Wi-Fi password for any of these can make it possible for anyone to hack your home or office network thus giving automatic access to any other connected platform such as emails, social media pages and even shared cloud or archive platforms.

Even though to get access to your IoT device, a would be attacker needs to have compromised the internet network already, or even the applications running on the device, we know that cyber-criminals just like a pack of wolves will not relent after smelling blood.

As a warning, when you are buying a new IoT device, ensure to check which CPU it is running on, and if that CPU is affected by these vulnerabilities.

 

Meltdown and Spectre 0 300

 Microsoft released Security Advisory 18002 on Wednesday, January 3, 2018 to mitigate a major vulnerability to Windows in modern CPU architectures. ESET released Antivirus and Antispyware module 1533.3 the same day to all customers to ensure that use of our products would not affect compatibility with Microsoft’s patch.

The first few days of 2018 have been filled with anxious discussions concerning a widespread and wide-ranging vulnerability in the architecture of processors based on Intel’s Core architecture used in PCs for many years, as well as processors from AMD, and even affecting ARM processors commonly used in tablets and smartphones.

The good news is that ESET can help protect against the types of malware that could take advantage of these vulnerabilities.

And, ESET was one of the very first security vendors to allow the Microsoft patch against the flaw to be enabled.

While ESET protects against potential malware infection, you should also take these steps to secure your computers and data:

  • Make sure your browser is up to date. For Chrome or Firefox users:
    • Mozilla has released information describing their response, including how Firefox 57 will address these security flaws.
    • Google has stated, “Chrome 64, due to be released January 23, will contain mitigations to protect against exploitation.” In the meantime, you can enable “Site Isolation” found in current stable versions of Chrome to provide better protection.
  • Make sure you update your ESET software, then update your Windows OS to protect against this exploit. To update ESET:
  • Customers should review ESET’s Knowledgebase article for important updates.
  • See this great collection of tips, articles and recommendations from the Google Project Zero team.
  • If you have a cloud-based server or have a website hosted by hosting provider, check to see what mitigations they have implemented already to prevent Meltdown.