Why Kenyans should take cyber security seriously 0 191

  • Cybersecurity can contribute immensely to the creation of quality employment opportunities for Kenyan citizens.
  • Kenya is yet to embrace any effective data protection regulations and the consequences are pretty evident in the Kenyan digital economy.
  • With the increased terrorist activities within Kenya, the Internet presents national enemies such as the Al-Shabaab and other extremist groups with a unique and ubiquitous opportunities.
Kenyan cyber security

There is no simple way to say this. Cybercriminals are pilfering Kenyans blind. The latter statement has been evidenced by the statistics present in the recent Cybersecurity Report published by Serianu, which asserts that Kenya lost about $175million last year. Moreover, the Report managed to establish that cybercrime perpetrators are deliberately targeting the Kenyan digital economy with the intention of wreaking havoc and making away with millions.

In terms of cyber resilience, the Kenyan digital economy can be likened to a slow, plump gazelle stumbling through the “cyber-savannah” in the full view of agile, informed and hungry cyber-predators who have begun to sink their teeth into their sumptuous prize.

Another daunting revelation is that organisations which have suffered substantial data breaches (which include reputable banks, insurance companies and SMEs) have decided to remain mum, much to the detriment of their clientele whose actual data is exploited for monetary gain by cybercriminals.

Regardless of the increased cybercrime incidents within the region, the state of Kenya’s digital economy is indeed on the rise.

Thanks to the concerted efforts of the private and public sector in creating an enabling environment, statistics published by the Communication Authority of Kenya in the first quarter of the 2016-2017 financial year highlight that the internet penetration rate in Kenya is at a robust 85%, with over 37 million internet subscribers who exchange data over various internet-based platforms.

These glowing statistics indicate the notable confidence in the quality of service provided by various digital companies. The latter can be attributed to the numerous marketing campaigns designed to reinforce consumer trust in digital services, but can Kenyans really trust good PR routines when it comes to the safety of their data?

The internet penetration rate in Kenya is at a robust 85%, with over 37 million internet subscribers Click to Tweet

What is in it for Kenyans if they begin to take their cyber security more seriously?

1. Jobs, Jobs and more Jobs:

Unemployment is a major challenge that affects youth across Kenya. Approximately 800,000 young Kenyans enter the labour market every year and youth unemployment is estimated to be as high as 35%, compared to the overall national unemployment rate of 10%.

Furthermore, 80% of unemployed Kenyans are below 35 years old. Notably, However, 70 per cent of the employed lot are under paid hence unable to take care of day-to-day needs. Thus, it can be demonstrated that unemployment will remain a thorn in the flesh until quality jobs can be created to further the development of the Kenyan populace.

Cybersecurity can contribute immensely to the creation of quality employment opportunities for Kenyan citizens.

Per the Kenya Cybersecurity Report, published by Serianu in 2016, the current number of internet subscribers stands at 37,716,579 users who are in turn served by only about 1400 certified cybersecurity professionals (these professionals are categorised as individuals who have attained CISA, CISM, GIAC, SANS, CISSP, CEH, ISO 27001 and PCI DSS QA certification).

Teddy Kungu, Country Manager of ESET East Africa has been famously quoted for stating that each cyber security professional in Kenya serves a population of at least 280000 citizens.

Per a 2003 study carried out by Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu (DTT), it was recommended that ideally one information security professional should serve every 1000 general users.

Not only does it makes sense to fill the demand for cybersecurity specialists, it also makes a lot of cents.

Jobs in the field of cyber security are outpacing job creation in the IT industry and can pay up to $6,500 USD more annually, or almost 10% more, than the average salary of average IT workers.

While many job positions in cybersecurity will require additional certifications, such as the CISSP, it’s far from impossible to migrate into a security position from other IT focuses. For newcomers to the IT field, there is also room to start out on a cyber security career path beginning with an entry level role as a security analyst.

2. Tougher Protection Regulations will Protect Citizens

Kenya is yet to embrace any effective data protection regulations and the consequences are pretty evident in the Kenyan digital economy.

Institutions handling sensitive data, such as banks, insurance firms and hospitals have no legislative obligation to disclose any data breach incidents to their unsuspecting clients.

The latter has contributed significantly to the web of secrecy spun around the value and occurrence of cyber crime incidents within Kenya. Kenya needs to note that clandestine behaviour only favours cyber criminals who thrive in markets that suffer silently.

Notably, most cyber crime occurrences chiefly affect the constitutional rights of consumer protection and privacy, significantly injuring the citizens.

With the enforcement of the General Data Protection Regulations in Europe, which compel institutions to disclose data breaches which affect EU citizens and non-EU citizens alike within European data centres, cyber criminals may be forced to seek greener pastures to ply their trade.

Kenya is a prime target, with immense income potential but not much regulatory and technical might. Cyber crime will continue to escalate in our region if citizens remain indifferent and the Government continues to rest on its laurels when it comes to updating their policies regarding cyber security in Kenya.

3. Cyber-bulling among the Youth needs better safeguards

The dark nexus between education, young minds and inadequate safeguards against cyber aggression has led to truly tragic cases of cyber-bulling within the developed and developing world.

An apt definition of cyber-bulling was coined by the Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention in South Africa which stated that cyber bullying, cyber violence, cyber aggression, internet bullying, electronic bullying, internet harassment or online harassment are terms used to refer to violence and aggression perpetrated through ICTs.

These cruel acts may include the sending of harassing emails or instant messages, posting obscene, insulting and slanderous messages on online bulletin boards or social networking sites, or developing web pages to promote and disseminate defamatory content.

The impact of cyber-bulling is particularly significant among girls.

Per a Report regarding cyber-violence against women and girls, published by The United Nations Broadband Commission for Digital Development Working Group on Broadband and Gender, about 73% of women and girls are abused online.

Kenyans need to act against these occurrences as it is in their best interest to protect the dignity of their women and children whilst enjoying digital services.

4. Children Need to be protected from Radicalisation and the Internet

With the increased terrorist activities within Kenya, the Internet presents national enemies such as the Al-Shabaab and other extremist groups with a unique and ubiquitous opportunity to access the susceptible young minds of our children to plant their vindictive perceptions of society.

Dr. Quintan Wiktorowicz, an internationally acclaimed expert on national security engagement and counter-terrorism produced a radicalization process model which highlights the initial need for a cognitive opening.

For the process of radicalization to achieve success, there must be an avenue to connect with a person who is receptive to the possibility of new ideas and world views. He highlights that insofar as the nexus between digital connectivity and radicalism is concerned, impressionability is vulnerability.

Impressionability is vulnerability. Dr. Quintan Wiktorowicz Click to Tweet

It is thus vital that whenever digital devices are availed to children safeguards should effectively be put in place. This should be widely adopted by Kenyan families through parents and legal guardians whose societal duty is to preserve the morality of their children.

Ignorance Injures Kenya’s socio-economic development

In one of Mzee Jomo Kenyatta’s landmark speeches, he famously stated that there existed three enemies to the Statehood of Kenya; the first was poverty, the second : disease and lastly: the plight of ignorance.

The ignorance of the impact of cybercrime within Kenya has already cost the nation millions of dollars and it threatens to exploit the data footprint of past, present and future generations. Kenyans must recognize the incentives of standing up for their data security and accept their role as guardians of their own information.

In order to enjoy safer technology, we must understand that security begins with you and me.

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Security trends to look out for in 2018 0 247

After a turbulent 2017 with Cyber Security making regular headlines, looking ahead to the coming year, there will no doubt be further discussions about the threat landscape.

Ransomware Revolution  – Ransomware of Things

Technological advances and their accelerated use have led to a number of scenarios considered unlikely just few years prior, are now within the realm of possibility. The advice going into 2018 from ESET researchers is to back up everything that matters to you, often, by keeping at least some backups offline – to media that aren’t routinely exposed to corruption by ransomware and other malware – in a physically secure location. As the Internet of Unnecessarily Networked Things becomes less avoidable, the attack surface increases, with networked devices and sensors embedded into unexpected items and contexts: from routers to fridges to smart meters, from TVs to toys, from power stations to petrol stations and pacemakers. As everything gets ‘smarter’, the number of services that might be disrupted by malware becomes greater.

Criminals following the money

With data being the most valuable asset, ransomware is set to remain in great demand among cybercriminals. It is important to note that many ransomware attacks are not sophisticated enough or never intended to recover the victim’s data once the ransom has been paid. For these reasons we suggest not only backing up of data online and offline but also implementing proper security measures such as proactively training staff on what phishing emails entail and how to avoid clicking on them and entering any credentials.

Critical infrastructure attacks on the rise

Cyber attacks on the Ukrainian power companies resulted in electricity service being turned off in hundreds of thousands of homes. The implications of this for future attacks of this kind include more than just the power grid but also includes critical manufacturing and food production, water and transport and the defence and healthcare sectors.

Safer for all

This year has seen ESET’s malware analysts continue to help law enforcement crack down on malicious campaigns and, by extension, the criminals spewing them. We are confident that 2018 will bring further successful investigations as we will continue to lend a hand to authorities so that, ultimately, the internet can become a safer place for everyone – except cybercriminals.

Download the full Security Trends 2018 report here

ESET’s top 5 tips for safe online shopping this festive season 0 288

safe online shopping

Holiday shopping is so quick and easy to do online, no traffic to get to the store, no waiting in queues or travelling to one specific shop just to find out – oh no, they’re out of stock of the one item you went there for.

We want to make sure your holiday shopping experience is quick, easy and most of all safe. Here are our top 5 tips for safe shopping this festive season:

  1. Don’t have the same passwords for all online shopping sites, have strong passwords and for extra security, change them before the holiday shopping commences.
  2. Only shop on trusted sites and directly from vendors.
  3. Don’t click on links from emails, instead go straight to the site on your browser.
  4.  When shopping online use a secure internet connection such as your home WiFi and make sure the necessary firewalls are in place – Avoid online payments via public WiFi.
  5. This coupled with a strong antivirus and/or anti-spyware software for scanning email, applications, and data that resides on your computer, you can rest assured that only you will catch or detect any form of intrusion in good time.

To find out how ESET can help secure your online shopping experience visit our website or contact us at sales@esetafrica.com