USB drives with built in antivirus launched 0 855

antivirus USB drives

ESET is set to develop a new range of secure USB flash drives that will come with in-built antivirus.

The new encrypted USB drives will feature built-in antivirus protection with built-in ClevX Drive Security powered by ESET, to keep contents of the USB flash drives safe and malware free, and prevent malware from spreading via removable media.

According to ESET East African Area Manager, Bruce Donovan, data protection is essential for businesses to keep their data safe due to increasing regulatory pressure as well as the need to safeguard their customers’ information in the highest possible way.

“We hope that this antivirus protection will better protect the end users data and devices from viruses and malware which can be transmitted by USB drives both at home and in offices,” said Mr. Donovan.

ESET has partnered with Swedish tech firm CTWO Products AB to come up with the ClevX DriveSecurity USBs that uses ESET’s Nod32 antivirus engine to detect and eliminate viruses, spyware, trojans, worms, rootkits, adware and other internet threats before they can be transmitted onto portable drives.

ClevX operates from the drive itself, for speed and convenience, with no need to install software onto a host computer.

CTWO Products AB vice president of sales and marketing Mr. James Baker said that today’s workers move from home to office and computer to computer frequently, and USB flash drives are a common means to transfer data between machines, which can lead to the rapid spreading of malware, unless they are protected.

“Our combined secure drive solution with ClevX and ESET provides a multitude of layers to protect users’ data and computers from potential data loss and infection. It also addresses the issue of portable media being a common source of malware infection, said Mr. Baker.

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5 Surefire Ways To Create a Cybersecure Home Office Experience 0 514

Man working on computer at home

For the next few weeks, you will probably find yourself working from home due to the coronavirus. Make sure you don’t forget about cybersecurity best practices that can help defend you against a cyberattack.

It’s no longer a secret that the current upsurge of the Coronavirus pandemic has disrupted normal operations in a lot of companies. An increasing number of workers are being forced to work from home or any other convenient places away from their company premises.

However, due to a sharp increase in the search volumes for the term Coronavirus, malicious developers are updating their toolkits with malicious links, sites, and Coronavirus-themed scams to capitalize on unsuspecting victims.

Therefore, as an employee working from home, you need to enforce adequate measures to counter such cybercrime threats. In this post, we take a look at five sure tips that can help you secure your home network. Let’s dig in!

1.     Check the default settings in your home router

Your home router is the engine of your home network. Without it, your PC can’t communicate with others on the net. This makes them a primary target for any cybercriminal out there.

In most cases, hackers will try to hack into your home router, and if successful, hijack your Wi-Fi traffic and finally have access to your network.

To prevent such an occurrence, you need to check your router’s settings and change the defaults. This means that you will first need to gain access to your router’s control panel before you make the changes.

Here are the steps:

  1. Open your browser and switch on your home network
  2. Type something like http://192.168.1.1 in your browser
  3. From the router configuration center page, you will be directed to change all the settings that can affect your security. For instance, your default user-names and passwords currently in your router. 
  4. Change your SSID (name of your home network), which stems from the fact that cybercriminals can use it to launch an attack. Case in point, taking a look at the SSIDs of Wi-Fi networks detected from my apartment shows that many of my neighbors are using Huawei routers; which can be free fodder for an attacker.
Screenshot of wi-fi networks on home laptop

To create strong and unique passwords, you can utilize the ESET password manager. One significant advantage of using such is that you don’t need to remember a lot. A single long phrase can be used to manage all your other account passwords with a few clicks.

Screenshot of ESET Password Manager on home laptop

2.     Kick-off any unwanted devices from your home network

Unrecognized devices hovering around your home network pose a significant threat to your system, as they can access your vital documents and credentials without your knowledge.

To fix this situation, you can subscribe to ESET Smart Security Premium, where you’ll enjoy the services of a home connected scanning tool, which can identify pesky neighbors who have been secretly using your Wi-Fi connection. After which you can flush them out from your network and finally change your passwords.

Screenshot of ESET Smart Security Premium on home laptop

3.     Get the latest firmware for your home router – or purchase a new one in case you have a legacy router

A recent discovery by the ESET team of how Wi-Fi chips are vulnerable to attacks brings to the fore, the importance of continually updating your home router’s system software to the latest manufacturer’s standards.

If you discover that you’re utilizing a legacy router, then it’s time you should opt for a new home router.

As a rule of thumb, grab one that has better security measures; such as those from the Gryphon brand that integrates threat intelligence.

This impressive technology provided by ESET enables the router to detect and block malware, phishing sites, as well as other threats that might invade your home network system.

For more information about the current configuration options for your home router, you can check out this blog post.

4.     Communicate through a virtual private network

To discreetly pass information over public networks to evade the ever-present prying eyes, you can enlist the services of a VPN.

It provides a safe tunnel for communication by encrypting your data and sending them in small packets across the network. Decryption only happens at the end of the tunnels, which ensures that your data is safe. 

5.     Make use of the two-factor authentication (2FA) to secure your remote access

Factually, the Remote desktop protocol (RDP) responsible for the security of remote systems has often been prone to attacks, especially where no proper protection is in place.

Cybercriminals, for instance, can hack a system’s RDP through brute-forcing their way in or social engineering passwords out of employees.

Fortunately, with technology such as the ESET Secure Authentication or ESET’s two-factor authentication (2FA) solution, you can secure doubly remote access technologies such as the RDP and VPN, as well as employee credentials.

The double layer of protection emanates from the fact that a 2FA solution requires an employee to enter a one-time code that is delivered to them through an authentication app or SMS, in addition to the usual corporate user-name and password.

As a result, an attacker can not have access to your information or credentials even if they compromise your password.

Final thoughts

Having a cyber secure home office is the way to go if companies are to realize their end goals without suffering significant setbacks due to the prevalent data security threats. ESET has been here for you for over 30 years. We want to assure you that we will be here to protect your online activities during these uncertain times, too. Protect yourself from threats to your online security with an extended trial of our award-winning software.

Try our extended 90-day trial for free.

Securing multiple operating systems on a single network? It is manageable 0 443

Many may think that companies exclusively use Windows devices. However, while it’s the most widespread operating system, it may not be the most suitable platform for all company needs. The current market share of operating systems in Kenya shows Android at 53% of the market, Windows at close to 28% of the market, OS X at under 5%, IOS close to 3% and Linux below 2%. Thus, it’s quite common to have an IT team monitoring the security of five different operating systems—Windows, Linux, Mac, Android, and iOS. However, the accompanying complexity may lead to certain cybersecurity risks that must be addressed.

ESET’s longitudinal data suggest that most large companies have at least one Mac computer. There are two reasons for the presence of Mac computers in the corporate ecosystem. Macs have long been highly sought by people employed in creative jobs—for example, in internal graphic teams, architectural firms, or advertising agencies—because the architecture of the Mac operating system is particularly suited to graphic design. In all these cases, Mac is used because of a clear business need. In other cases, it is mainly a matter of personal preference of employees or the management who choose Mac; for example, because its user interface suits them better or exclusively because of its high-end design.

Mac as a carrier of malware

Many users believe that the Mac operating system is inherently safer than Windows. However, this is a distorted view caused by the fact that attackers focus on operating systems that are deployed on a broader scale, which in turn enables them to make more money either by stealing it, or by monetizing stolen data. However, there are many examples of Mac malware and users should not fall into a false sense of security.

One way that attackers leverage Macs is by looking beyond their value as a potential end-targets, but instead, as carriers. Yes, Macs can be used to introduce malware that is not targeted at the Mac platform itself and deliver it to an otherwise secure network. If the Mac computer in question is not protected, it can transfer Windows-targeted malware onto Windows devices within the company’s network—the malware connects to the network, bypasses the network firewall or sandbox, and the corporate network gets infected. The same applies to Linux and Android devices that can be potential carriers of malware as well as targets.

Mobile devices: iOS is more secure

The situation is different with respect to mobile devices. The iOS platform for Apple mobile devices has been designed to be safe via its internal structure. In iOS, each application runs in its own sandbox with very limited rights for interacting with other applications. The application does not have the access rights unless the user explicitly grants that permission. It’s different from Windows where each application runs primarily under the system account, thus receiving access rights for the entire system. The reason why there are no security applications for iOS is that this type of application would have access rights only for itself. It could scan itself and maybe photos and contacts. Apple also performs whitelisting in its application store in an attempt to prevent harmful items entering. For these reasons, iOS could be described as a safer operating system. However, this does not apply if a jailbreak has been performed on an iOS device. Jailbreaking is a process that disables certain security features.

Security risks also arise when a corporate mobile, is stolen or lost. In this scenario, iOS is not immune from risk since an employee’s device may contain business emails, valuable contacts, and photos from internal meetings because people often take pictures of the meeting notes. In other words, there is a lot of potentially sensitive data on employee devices that is not always efficiently protected. For example, when employees do not set a PIN, or use a weak PIN on the device in question.

Companies can enforce security policies cross platform

How does a company know whether a corporate device is jailbroken or whether an employee has set up an effective PIN to protect access to their Apple phone? Companies can do this using Mobile Device Management (MDM) solutions; for example, ESET Mobile Device Management for Apple iOS. The iOS system uses the Apple Mobile Device Management framework, and in some countries the Device Enrollment Program (DEP) is available as well. In this scenario, the company buys an iOS device pre-enrolled within its organization. When the device is turned on, it connects directly to the company’s MDM solution and installs a security profile based on the company’s specifications.

The company can define what security settings or state it requires for a device; for example, to confirm that a device is not jailbroken or that a secure access PIN code is deployed containing at least 6 characters (or alternatively a fingerprint lock) and the employee changes it at reasonable intervals. If a device does not meet these requirements, the company can remotely disable access to corporate email or restrict other device functionality. Further, it is also possible to localize the device, flag it as lost and thenremotely wipeit. This is useful, for example, when a corporate iOS device is lost or stolen or if the company discovers that the employee has been leaking sensitive company data.

Android really needs a security application

The Android operating system is more open than iOS, which is the primary reason why a security app should be used on all Android devices. Just as with iOS, an employee’s Android device can contain sensitive data, emails, and photos. There are several MDM solutions available for Android that enforce specific security policies on corporate Android devices.

For example, there is Android for Work, i.e. the native Google ecosystem. Alternatively, there are solutions that run with administrator privileges within the device. An example of such an application is ESET Endpoint Security for Android that contains not only MDM functionality but also multi-layered security features such as protection against malware and anti-phishing. The Google Play store, which is the main source of Android apps, has less stringent rules than Apple’s app store; therefore, sometimes, attackers are able to upload malicious apps. Thus, an Android device without a security app installed can get infected even when the employee’s behavior is neither risky nor unsafe.

Diverse operating systems require Integrated management

All company devices with the ESET MDM solution or ESET security program installed can be monitored remotely from the ESET Security Management Center web console. The operating system of those company devices is irrelevant—it could be Windows, Mac, Linux, Android, or iOS. This remote management console informs the administrator about the security state on the device in question and can help warn the company about unwanted or suspicious activity.

Complete network, hardware, and software visibility

ESET’s remote management console can also provide the administrator with a lot of information about possible security incidents in the network, the hardware of individual computers, such as their manufacturer, model, serial number, processor, RAM, disk space, and much more, and installed software including version numbers and additional details.

ESET Security Management Center comes included as part of all ESET enterprise-grade solutions.

To find out more about ESET Security Management Center and to book a FREE in-house cybersecurity training session for your organisation, please sign up below.