New parental control app monitors children’s online activities 0 699

New parental control app

Global Security software provider ESET has unveiled a new tool to help parents monitor what their children are doing online. The ESET Parental Control for Android app provides provides age and category-based filters and will restrict children’s access to inappropriate web content.

The application also comes with an ‘Application Guard & Time Management’ function that will also help parents regulate the amount of time their children spend on gaming and internet browsing. It also comes with a ‘Child Locator’ service which can be used to track their child’s location.

Speaking during this announcement, ESET East Africa Area Manager, Mr. Bruce Donovan said that children are increasing accessing the internet from mobile devices as opposed to computers increasing the need for parents to manage what their children do with their tablets and smartphones.

“We conducted a study that showed 88 percent of parents are worried about what their children can access online. Out of these, 71 percent mentioned their children had in the past forwarded personal details to strangers; while 61 percent highlighted excessive amounts of time spent on devices,”  Mr. Donovan said.

Despite parental fears and the move by the Communication Authority through the Child Online Protection Campaign, only few of parents have installed a parental control app to help manage their children’s online experiences, the survey revealed.

The company says the ESET Parental Control for Android app safeguards children on smartphone devices by giving them protection and user experience, without limiting performance. Designed to help parents protect their children against internet threats and inappropriate web pages, the app boasts a wealth of child protection features and a friendly user interface.

“Even as we offer protection, it is important that the application creates and builds a respectful relations between parents and children who use their own smartphones or tablets,” Mr. Donovan added.  It enables them to be sure that children of all ages can enjoy the wealth of information and entertainment available online without the fear of online threats.

The app contains an added option for children to ask their parents for special permission to access certain apps or web content, or ask for extra gaming or browsing time. ESET Parental Control for Android is available from the Google Play Store, at the my.eset.com portal or via ESET’s partners.

“It is always best to first teach your child the correct way to use the internet then make them aware of the risks and dangers that can result from misuse, making it clear that parental control tools are installed for their own safety,” concluded Mr. Donovan.

Other additional features of the ESET Parental Control app include  the ‘Parental message’ which is allows the parents to read SMSes sent to the child and the ‘Reports for Parents’ which sends regular emailed to parents on their children’s internet usage.

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ESET East Africa launches a new line of enterprise security solutions 0 592

ESET Enterprise solutions

ESET, the leader in cybersecurity research and a top European Union-based endpoint security company, announces the launch of its new line of enterprise security solutions designed to provide the global enterprise sector with tools for prevention and management of cyber risks on a global scale.

ESET East Africa is raising its game with the introduction of ESET Dynamic Threat Defense, an off-premise cloud sandboxing solution providing almost instant analysis of zero-day and ransomware threats before they reach the network.

As recently reported by Forrester[1], buyers want an “endpoint security suite that consolidates capabilities and minimizes complexity when possible.” ESET East Africa’s new line of cybersecurity solutions meets this demand and offers something extra.

The new line of enterprise security solutions also welcomes the brand-new ESET Security Management Center, a revamp of the renowned online console ESET Remote Administrator. This online console provides not only complete network visibility and full security management via one single pane of glass, but also fully customizable reporting and single-click threat remediation, adding important complexity-minimizing elements to the whole suite.

“We understand global enterprise increasingly requires cybersecurity solutions that are more tailored to their specific needs, because we cooperate with a large number of them at the country level,” explained Juraj Malcho, Chief Technology Officer at ESET. “Get your hands on our latest offering and you’ll see how easily manageable an enterprise security solution can be.”

The ESET Endpoint Protection solutions offer enterprises increased visibility of the alerts being sent to ESET LiveGrid® – a platform made up of 110 million sensors worldwide and verified by ESET research & development centers. This allows customers to have the highest level of confidence when viewing data and reports within their consoles.

ESET East Africa offices are based in Nairobi to offer local support to our ever-growing partner base in the East African region. As part of our commitment to the growth of our partners, we are fully focused on servicing our channel. As an ESET East Africa partner, you will benefit from our technical, sales and marketing expertise to assist with deal closure, technical support and onsite training.

ESET East Africa’s new enterprise products and services are designed to be seamlessly deployed in parallel with the existing ESET enterprise offer. For more information about this offering, visit our website.

[1] The Forrester WaveTM: Endpoint Security Suites, Q2 2018 report

Play it safe during FIFA 2018 0 891

We do realize that you’ve been caught up in the hurly-burly of the FIFA World Cup, but surely you have a few minutes to spare and peruse our roster of tips to stay safe online not only during the soccer spectacle. While you’re at it, recognize that no single player, no matter how stellar, is enough to put you on a path to success. In fact, being even one player short can be enough to trip you up. What should the pillars of your cybersecurity game plan be, then?

#1 A stitch in time saves nine

Last year went down in history for two serious cyber-incidents – the WannaCryptoroutbreak and the Equifax hack – that served up powerful reminders of the merits of swiftly squashing security bugs. 2017 also saw the highest number of  vulnerabilities reported.

So the number one player in you security team is updates. In your home settings, making sure that automatic updates are enabled for your operating system and software is an easy step to take to keep attackers away.

 

#2 Prune your team

Get rid of that disgruntled bench-warmer who ends up sapping your team’s morale. Software that you hardly ever use can become a liability simply by increasing your attack surface. To further reduce the possible entry points for cybercriminals, you may also want to disable unused services and ports, and ditch programs that have a track record of vulnerabilities.

For your browser, consider blocking ads and removing all but the most necessary of browser add-ons and plugins. While you’re at it, shut down the accounts that you no longer need and use your high-privilege, or admin, account only for administrative tasks.

#3 Practice strong password hygiene

One of the easiest ways to protect your online identities consists in using a long, strong and unique password or better still, passphrase, for each of your online accounts. It may well come in handy if your login credentials leak, for example due to a breach at your service provider – which, in fact, is far too common a scenario. Further, just as you’d never share your teams tactics with your opponents, you should never share your password with anybody.

If you’re like most people and find the need to remember many username/password combinations overwhelming, consider using a password manager, which is intended to store your passwords in a “vault”.

#4 Look before you leap

Even if you have the most complex of passwords or passphrases, be aware of where you input them.

Online, everything is just a click away, and scammers are keenly aware of that. In their pursuit of your personal information, they use social engineering methods to sucker you into clicking a link or opening a malware-laden attachment.

5 questions to ask yourself before clicking on a link are:

  1. Do you trust the sender of the link?
  2. Do you trust the platform?
  3. Do you trust the destination?
  4. Does the link coincide with a major world event like the FIFA worldcup? (Cyber criminals tend to be opportunistic this way)
  5. Is it a shortened link?

#5 Add a factor

When aiming for secure accounts, you need to up your ante by using two-factor authentication, particularly for accounts that contain Personally Identifiable Information (PII) or other important data. The extra factor will require you to take an extra step to prove your identity when you attempt to log in or conduct a transaction. That way, even if your credentials leak or your password proves inadequate, there is another barrier between your account and the attacker.

#6 Use secure connections

When you connect to the internet, an attacker can sometimes place himself between your device and the connection point. To reduce the risk that such a man-in-the-middle attack will intercept your sensitive data while they are in motion, use only web connections secured by HTTPS (particularly for your most valued accounts) and use trusted networks such as your home connection or mobile data when performing the most sensitive of online operations, such as mobile banking. Needless to say, secure Wi-Fi connections should be underpinned by at least WPA2 encryption (or, ideally, WPA3as soon as it becomes available) – even at home – together with a strong and non-default administrator password and up-to-date firmware on your router.

Be very wary of public Wi-Fi hotspots. If you need to use such a connection, avoid sending personal data or use a reputable virtual private network (VPN) service, which keeps your data private via the use of an encrypted “tunnel”. Once you’re done, log out of your account and turn off Wi-Fi.

#7 Hide behind a firewall

A firewall is one of your key defensive players. Indeed, it is often thought of as the very first line of defense. It can typically be a piece of software in your computer, perhaps as part of anti-malware software, or it can be built into your router – or you can actually use both a network- and a host-based firewall. Regardless of its implementation, a firewall acts as a brawny bouncer that, based on predetermined rules, allows or denies traffic from the internet into an internal network or computer system.

#8 Back up

A backup is the kind of player who doesn’t get much time on the pitch, but when he does get the nod, he can “steal the show”. True, we might have spoken ill of bench warmers earlier, but a reliable backup is definitely not the kind of player to spoil your team’s chemistry.

Your system cannot usually be too – or completely – safe from harm. Beyond a cyber-incident, your data could be compromised by something as unpredictable as a storage medium failure. A backup is an example of a measure that is corrective in nature, but that is fully dependent on how hard you “practiced”. Or, as Benjamin Franklin put it, “by failing to prepare, you are preparing to fail”. It will cost you some time and possibly money to create (time and time again) your backups, but when it comes to averting (data) loss, this player may very well save the day for you.

#9 Select security software

Even if you use your common sense and take all kinds of “behavior-centered” precautions, you need another essential addition to your roster. At a time when you’re pitted against attackers who are ever more skilled, organized and persistent, dedicated security software is one of the easiest and most effective ways to protect your digital assets.

A reliable anti-malware solution uses many and various detection techniques and deploys multiple layers of defense that kick in at different stages of the attack process. That way, you’re provided with multiple opportunities to stymie a threat, including the latest threats, as attackers constantly come up with new malicious tools. This underscores the importance of always downloading the latest updates to your anti-malware software, which ideally are released several times a day. Top-quality security software automates this process, so you needn’t worry about installing the updates.

#10 Mobiles are computers, too!

Much of this article’s guidance also applies to smartphones and tablets. Due to their mobility, however, these devices are more prone to being misplaced or stolen. It is also of little help that users tend to view security software as belonging in the realm of laptops and desktops. But mobile devices have evolved to become powerful handheld computers and attackers have been shifting their focus to them.

There’s a number of measures you can take to reduce risks associated with mobile devices. They include relying on a secure authentication method to unlock your device’s screen, backing up the device, downloading system and app updates as soon as they’re available (preferably automatically, if possible), installing only reputable apps and only from legitimate stores, and making sure to use device encryption if it’s not turned on by default.

A dedicated mobile security solution will also go a long way towards enhancing your protection from mobile threats. This includes a scenario whereby your device goes missing, so you are then able to use the suite’s anti-theft and remote-wipe functionalities.

#11 Be aware

The final team member is, in fact, you – the keeper. Stay vigilant and cyber-aware and educate yourself on safe online habits. Don’t ever say, “it won’t/can’t happen to me”, because everyone is a potential target and victim. Recognize that one click is enough to inflict major damage on yourself and others, and that breaking good security practices for the sake of convenience may come back to bite you worse than Luis Suárez did in 2014. After all, how secure we are is largely dependent on how we use the technology.

So there you have it. You may want to enjoy the soccer now.